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At what speed does bipedal forward propulsion... (Read 232 times)

kkittenkat


English Villian

    become running?

     

    Anyone like to take a stab at this one? At what speed can you call yourself a runner?

    Or should we be super inclusive and class running as any speed as long as you're putting one foot in-front of the other?

      I have actually debated this a few times.  My belief is that what differentiates running from jogging varies from person to person.  It is relative to yourself and no one else.  For example, if I go do a mile in 6:30, I can assure you, I am RUNNING.  But if Galen Rupp, or some people on this board, do the same thing - they are jogging.  To some, a 20 minute 5k is running to within an inch of your life.  To others, it is a stroll.

       

      To assign a one size fits all pace is inaccurate and unfair.

      Yeah, well...sometimes nothin' can be a real cool hand.

        I would go with the same method as how they do the speed walking.

         

        If you have both feet off the ground at the same time you are running.  If you always have at least part of one foot on the ground you are walking.

         

        There are folks who would be able to BQ "walking" the entire time.  (The world record 50K is a 6:50 pace).

         

        There are people I see at our monthly running club races that are "running" at about twice that pace.

         

        I don't think there is anyway to classify the difference between jogging and running.

        Age: 49 Weight: 210 Height: 6'3" (Goal weight 195)

        Current PR's:  Mara 3:14:36* (2017); HM 1:36:13 (2017); 10K 43:59 (2014); 5K 21:12 (2016)


        One day at a time

          If you would be disqualified during race walking, it's running! (Even though the high school kids I know who race walk would beat me if I were running at the same time...)

          paul2432


            become running?

             

            Anyone like to take a stab at this one? At what speed can you call yourself a runner?

            Or should we be super inclusive and class running as any speed as long as you're putting one foot in-front of the other?

             

             

            Who is "we" and why do we get to decide who is a runner?

             

            Regarding what is running - I agree with others, if two feet are in the air, it's running.

             

            Regarding who is a runner - anyone that chooses to self-identify as a runner is a runner.  Running and being a runner are not the same thing, just like singing and being a singer are not the same thing - I sing happy birthday a few times a year, but nobody, including myself would call me a singer.


            Good Grief!

              become running?

               

              Anyone like to take a stab at this one? At what speed can you call yourself a runner?

              Or should we be super inclusive and class running as any speed as long as you're putting one foot in-front of the other?

               

              Jogging is a subset of running as is sprinting. As long as both feet are off the ground at the same time at some time during each stride, it is running. If one runs, they could call themselves a runner though many don't because them seem to have various misconceptions about the definitions, usually revolving around pace or racing.

              2018 Goals: taking suggestions
              2018 Races: NC 24

                You know my repeated quote from somewhere:

                joggers run for fitness

                racers run for performance

                runners run because they like to

                 

                And all of these overlap to different extents with each individual.

                 

                 

                but technically, yeah, if both feet are off the ground during stride it's running not walking. Philosophically, I don't think there is a speed/pace that separates runners from normal humans. It's participation and intent that separates. However, "running" and "runner" can be a vague terms. Just like the Eskimos have 50 words for snow, each for a different type or time or other factor, there should be many words for running or runner. We all know jogging, sprinting, loping, cruising, fartlek, shuffling, floating as words for running, and elite, jogger, mid-pack, ultramarathoner, pacer, miler, trail runner, kicker as words for runners. So, being a "runner" is a huge target that a lot of people could hit.

                55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying


                Old , Ugly and slow

                  I am a very slow trail runner

                  I find the word jogger offensive.

                  first race sept 1977 last race sept 2007

                   

                  2018 goals   1000  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

                  Eisenmench


                  <3's heckin long zoomies

                    Regarding who is a runner - anyone that chooses to self-identify as a runner is a runner.  Running and being a runner are not the same thing, just like singing and being a singer are not the same thing - I sing happy birthday a few times a year, but nobody, including myself would call me a singer.

                     

                    I like this stance.

                    When giving maximum effort, I currently can run a ~7:30 mile. I consider myself a runner.

                    One friend's maximum effort is around 13:30 mile. She considers herself a runner.

                    Another friend's maximum effort is around 7:00. He doesn't consider himself a runner. His explanation is that he only runs when his work makes him.

                     

                    All of the above are OK with me, as I feel it's not my place to tell someone what they are/aren't.

                    Started running - 2014

                    1st marathon - 2017

                     

                    Still trying to figure out a good training plan that works for me.

                    sport jester


                    Biomimeticist

                      First off, you'd be highly incorrect to state humans are bipedal. We're quadrupeds.

                       

                      Second point to your question is easy. If you start walking on a treadmill, and slowly increase your speed, at some point you have to stop walking and start running. It's called your walk to run transition speed.

                       

                      Most runners, would transition anywhere between 3.0 and 3.5MPH. Of course the lower your transition speed, the less efficient you move.

                       

                      Oh, and I've been documented to walk at 9MPH.

                      Experts said the world is flat

                      Experts said that man would never fly

                      Experts said we'd never go to the moon

                       

                      Name me one of those "experts"...

                       

                      History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

                        I wish they would standardize the terms for what defines running and jogging. I read somewhere that if your mile pace is slower than 8 minute miles you are jogging. That being said, I have my own made up names for the various strides I do, my point being that form rather than pace should define what you are doing. Karate people might know the "cat" walk where you have both feet on the ground and transfer the center of balance to the forward foot before lifting the rear, this helps you to always be balanced and ready to act. Now, I agree if at least one foot is touching the ground at all times you are walking.  Then there is the "shuffle" where you barely move the front foot forward and let it drop as you pick up the rear foot. Since both feet momentarily leave the ground it may still be called running, although it can be slower than walking. But, as I have seen in races, if the turnover is fast enough you can get a good pace even with something like a shuffle. I often use the shuffle  when first starting training, when tired or going up a steep hill. Then, there is what I call "trotting along" where you give a push with the ankle of your rear foot and lift the front one up a bit more. Then, finally you get into the real "running stride" where you are using the legs more. both to push off in the rear and to extend forward for the next stride. Of course there are many variations of a "running stride" and some racers will use a different form for a while in a race to vary the muscle strains.  Sprinters lift the legs up and stretch out far and are pushing off with the toes. Long distance runners might lift the legs up less and not extend the foot forward as much with the goal of running most efficiently. Anyway, for me I would say I'm running if I'm doing 10 minute miles or better since at that point I would be using like a running stride.


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                          Running and jogging are synonyms, I think, and not well-defined, but walking, at least in the sport of race-walking, is fairly clearly defined.

                          It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


                          an amazing likeness

                            Good grief, did someone say Beetlejuice three times or something...

                            I've done my best to live the right way. I get up every morning and go to work each day. (for now)

                              Dwight Schrute!


                              Old , Ugly and slow

                                This morning one of my trail miles took me 20 minutes, i was still running .

                                first race sept 1977 last race sept 2007

                                 

                                2018 goals   1000  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

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