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Lighten up, it's just running (Read 1564 times)


Prince of Fatness

    Semi-retired.

      I'll try sarge...

      Full metal jacket

      Julia1971


      All in for Boston

        I think most new runners, if they have a competitive background in other sports, would automatically have a tendency to over-train and push too hard every day.  In most other sports you really push yourself hard, every day.  You can't do that in running and last very long. 

         

        I don't know.  Maybe it depends on the sport and the level of competition that person had reached.  Thinking back on my practices in high school and college, I really don't think we went hard every day.  For example, I'm pretty sure practices the day after a game or track meet were easy.  And, that translates to running - runs the day after a race should be easy. 

         

        I would also guess that most formerly competitive athletes would be better at distinguishing the difference between soreness that can be worked through and pain that needs to be looked at by a doctor.  They've probably had coaches and P.T.s questioning and advising them on how to tell the difference for years.  Then again, that may give them a false sense of confidence.

         

        As far as the article, though, I think there is a lot of information overload and it's hard to know how to start.  IMHO, running clubs can be awful for the beginning runner as far as advice.  (I think they're great for other things like motivation).  I found myself getting so much unsolicited advice and a lot of it sounded pretty sketchy.

        Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin

          I don't know.  Maybe it depends on the sport and the level of competition that person had reached.  Thinking back on my practices in high school and college, I really don't think we went hard every day. 

           

          Agreed - background in other sports if anything gives you a sense of when to back off, and ingrains the concept of easy days. In fact, in most sports you just can't "go hard" every day, it's not possible. In football, we always had sunday off, monday for jogging and watching film, tuesday some hitting but mostly learning new schemes for week, wed and thurs "hard" practice, friday walkthrough (no pads), saturday game. Baseball (I know, the concept of "pushing hard" in baseball might seem comical), as a pitcher, you just can't pitch every day. You have easy long toss days, days you don't throw at all, short bullpen days, and games. Etc., etc.

           

          Of course, I'm just coming off an injury, so what do I know?

          Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
          We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes
          Julia1971


          All in for Boston

            Baseball (I know, the concept of "pushing hard" in baseball might seem comical), [...] 

             

            Of course, I'm just coming off an injury, so what do I know?

             

            LOL!  It does.

             

            +1 on so what do I know.  I was thinking back on my competitive sports days during my run this morning and thought, maybe if I did practice harder I'd have made it to the NCAA championships or the Olympics.  I hate thinking about that.

            Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin


            Fast is better than long

              "When the researchers tried to figure out how to prevent the injuries, they learned that the only thing associated with running injuries was, in fact, running. The more people ran, the more likely it was that they would become injured. "

               

              That's lousy logic if I've ever seen it.

               

              Also, I don't think it's true--except among beginning runners.

               

              The likelihood of winning the lottery was increased by playing the lottery.

              2014 Goals: 2500 miles / sub 2 800m / 4:30 mile / sub 16:30 5K


              Give a man a fire and he'll be warm the rest of the night;
              Set a man afire and he'll be warm the rest of his life.

              What in the Jehu?

              JimR


                "...there is nothing like starting your Saturday morning being beaten by 75-year-old men and passed at the finish line by 8-year-old kids. It is quite humbling.”

                 

                I feel his pain.

                 

                 

                Ceeeeryst...I run in Ed Whitlock land. I'm a scared to even enter races around here.

                  Most of us here on RA have our lenses tainted with the ability and willingness to go out and run and be active. 

                  However, there are others out there who don't.  They sit at home and do nothing and may have just recently picked up a set of shoes and decided recently to get going. 

                   

                  For them, an article like this may be valuable.

                   

                  I admit that there are portions of it that are comical in their words "running causes running injuries..."

                   

                  But, there is a portion of the article that has merit, I think.


                  For a new runner, they need to learn stuff.

                  They seek advice from people, and the advice they may hear is foreign to them...

                   

                  - "you should have 185 steps per minute"

                  - "you should be mid-foot or fore-foot striker"

                  - "you should be able to do xx miles per week"

                   

                  They don't get it.  They don't understand how to get from where they are to where they need to be. 

                  Likewise, the tenured runners and people who do it, may not understand the inexperienced runner, and may not know how they need to get there.  Some of them have run for 20+ years and may not know the month 1 challenges for someone who starts running at age 50.

                   

                  This portion within the article sounds good, I think....

                  “We tell people we don’t know a thing about the best technique,” he said. He tells runners to use the form they naturally adopt.

                  Running form is just one example of the confusions buffeting beginning runners. Running, said John Raglin, professor of kinesiology at Indiana University, “is so prone to these sorts of trends.”

                  People “will latch onto anything,” he added, and an anecdote or two about what is supposed to be an ideal running form often passes for evidence.

                  2014 Goals:

                  #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                  #2: 365 Hours training

                   

                    the more you play tennis, the greater the chance you will be injured playing tennis. 

                    In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

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                    rlemert


                      Regarding the "the only thing that correlates with injury from running is running" idiocy...the best analogy I can think of is to tell somebody that they should avoid ever getting close to other people because they might have their heart broken.  In both cases it is assinine to give up on doing something so good for you and rewarding because their may be some boo-boos along the way.

                       

                        Perhaps a better analogy is driving. The more you drive, the more likely you are to be involved in an accident at some point. Even if you're a very careful driver, you're just giving yourself that many more opportunities to get hit. It's not that driving causes the accidents so much as the fact that it increases your exposure.

                        OP reporting back.

                        Regarding timidity among beginners:  Some people are just not going to run, ever.  They will find excuses.  Some may really not be physically able to run.  Others are indeed intimidated by the likes of us runners, with our lingo, equipment, training plans, our casual talk of 26+ mile races and 200 mile weeks, and, yes, by our fitness/skinniness.

                        Regarding competitiveness:  Some are totally turned off by competitiveness, whether it hearkens back to bad experiences in school, or it's just not in their nature to engage in physical competition.  Too bad, because running better accommodates all levels of competitiveness, zero to extreme, better than almost any other physical endeavor.

                        Then there are the people who are too competitive, whose goal is to somehow prove themselves.  The media romanticize this kind of approach - to accomplish your goal, you just have to try harder, to want it more.  Bludgeon yourself (to use Mikey's charming expression from another thread).  Just grinding out the miles, year after year, doesn't make a good movie.  So these people decide to BQ in six weeks.  They hurt themselves and decide running is stupid.

                        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                        fatboy


                          "Until last spring, Dr. Smith thought running was not for him. He’d tried it a few times. Inevitably, after about a quarter of a mile, he decided it was not fun."

                           

                           

                          Far and away my favorite three sentances in this article....so assuming The dean of the business school at Indiana U. was shuffleing along at a 10 minute pace he got 2 minutes and 30 seconds in and made the decision running was not fun and gave up.  Amazing. 

                          2012Goals: Run 1500 miles  *   < 3:30 marathon  *  Complete first 70.3  

                                               <20 5K

                           

                           

                          Scotch, Scotch, Scotch.....Down in my belly.

                            "Until last spring, Dr. Smith thought running was not for him. He’d tried it a few times. Inevitably, after about a quarter of a mile, he decided it was not fun."

                             

                             

                            Far and away my favorite three sentances in this article....so assuming The dean of the business school at Indiana U. was shuffleing along at a 10 minute pace he got 2 minutes and 30 seconds in and made the decision running was not fun and gave up.  Amazing. 

                             

                            Yep, he gave it the old college try.

                            Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

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