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High Dry to Low Humid (Read 91 times)

    Soo...I hear a lot of runners giving/receiving advice on running at higher elevations, but I have the opposite issue. I've never raced below 5k'...and my first one is Saturday in a Florida swamp. (Trail Half-Marathon.) Obviously, the elevation drop won't be an issue, but the one thing I am worried about is responding to the large humidity change. I sweat like a pig even in Colorado...afraid of how I'll react out here. Anything different I should do to prepare "day of" in these type of conditions? Wonder if I should drink more/less than normal, etc.

     

    Stange inquiry I know...but I just don't know!

      No, this isn't a strange inquiry. Like all weather/climate concerns, everyone reacts differently. It normally tcakes a couple weeks to adjust to a different climate, and still then I think very few people run well in high humdity.  Being a trail race in the swamp means it will be more humid than normal... and far beyound what you experience at high altitude.

       

      The main advise I have is to ensure you're well hydrated before the race (that can be from juice fruit, too), be sensible about your pace early on (start more conservative than usual), and hydrate every couple miles, including electrolytes.

       

      Good luck

        I live in south Florida. Humidity and I? We've met. Smile

         

        Having never run very far from sea-level, I can't help with any direct advice. Although when I've talked with runners that were visiting from higher elevations (ie-Colorado) they have described the experience as running underwater.

         

        On the positive side- humidity levels are currently at/near the years low- right now 32%.

        pae


          I'm in a similar position to Derek.  I've only done one run that was below 6000 feet in elevation (and that one was at a mere 5200 feet in elevation).  I'll be going to Cincinnati in two months for the Flying Pig marathon, and I'm hoping it won't be too terribly humid.  I'll be going there a few days in advance, and hopefully that will help a little bit.

            I live in south Florida. Humidity and I? We've met. Smile

             

            Having never run very far from sea-level, I can't help with any direct advice. Although when I've talked with runners that were visiting from higher elevations (ie-Colorado) they have described the experience as running underwater.

             

            On the positive side- humidity levels are currently at/near the years low- right now 32%.

             

            Yep, it's been pretty dry this year. And right now it's just cold. Wink

             

            And +1 to what BoilerTom said.

              Just went for a little jog this afternoon and "survived". Although since I'm used to running anywhere from 10-30 degrees, it felt pretty warm! (Despite only being about 60 Joking) Thanks for the advice, I'll try to take it easy starting out the race, since my "lungs" might not match how my legs feel. This is more of a training race for a long one I have in April, so the time isn't TOO important to me anyways.

               

              Ill try not to fade into the swamp as a big pile of sweat.

                Ill try not to fade into the swamp as a big pile of sweat.

                 

                Keep an eye out for pythons. Wink

                  Well then. That was warm.

                   

                  Alright, so it was only in the 70s....but still. Made it without issue, although I believe I may have broke my sweat record. I guzzled extra water (usually I barely drink any for anything 2ish hours or fewer, but I changed that habit today.

                   

                  Good times though, Florida is definitely a different animal than Colorado for a race! Thanks for everyone's help.

                   

                  Sadly...I was unable to find a python. Smile

                    Sadly...I was unable to find a python. Smile

                     

                    The pythons were probably dug in due the cold and dry conditions. Try again when the weather returns to normal. They will...um, I mean, you will have a better chance then.