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Do I really need rest days? (Read 234 times)

    If you're currently running every other day.... and wanting to run more...

     

    Perhaps run 2 in a row then 1 off?

     

    Or keep your current schedule and increase every other run a bit? ie. instead of 3miles every run... run an easy 3mi after you run an easy 5mi... etc...

     

    good luck!

    300m- 37 sec.

    LedLincoln


      You need recovery days.  That's not the same as rest days, though rest days are recovery days.  There's a website devoted to streakers, the kind who run every day.   The longest streak is over 40 years running at least one mile a day.  So do you really need rest days?  Probably not, but you do need recovery days when you run very short and easy.  As others have also mentioned, if you need one, take it.

       

      Yeah, when I'm running 60-70 mile weeks, a 3 or 4 mile day is a rest day. Or call it a recovery day.

      Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits.
      - Mark Twain

         As others have also mentioned, if you need one, take it.

         

        I'm 54 yo. After a 9 day run streak, stepped off for a run yest. evening, took about 50 steps and found out that I needed a rest day. Walked back, grabbed a beer and watched some hockey. Sometimes your body just tells you what to do.

        Saturnine


          Thank you all for your thoughtful replies. I think I'm going for the "active recovery" route, where at least once a week I'll just walk a lot and do some easy yoga. I also found this rather awesome boxing class that I'll go to twice a week, so I probably won't run on those days (it's a REALLY intensive class, my entire upper body feels like cooked spaghetti by the end). Definitely not recovery days, but my knees and ankles get a break, AND I get my aerobic fix! So just like that I have four days of running, which is reasonable by any standard, yes? Yay for helpful forums and crosstraining.

           

          And yeah, Jaybar, apparently your body sometimes just tells you it needs a rest day? That actually happened to me this Tuesday - shoes laced up and ready to go, and I just got this deep sense of "You know what? We shouldn't exercise today. Today, we need Indian food and a movie." Sounds like laziness, but I swear it wasn't - more like a no-nonsense inner mom who knows what's best for you and is deaf to your whining about "but my training plaan" and "but we're already at the gyyym". Wednesday's run felt great.

          LedLincoln


            Boy, if I had Indian food and a movie competing with my running, I'd be in trouble. Good thing I'm a morning runner.

            Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits.
            - Mark Twain

            Tchuck


              Thank you all for your thoughtful replies. I think I'm going for the "active recovery" route, where at least once a week I'll just walk a lot and do some easy yoga. I also found this rather awesome boxing class that I'll go to twice a week, so I probably won't run on those days (it's a REALLY intensive class, my entire upper body feels like cooked spaghetti by the end). Definitely not recovery days, but my knees and ankles get a break, AND I get my aerobic fix! So just like that I have four days of running, which is reasonable by any standard, yes? Yay for helpful forums and crosstraining.

               

              And yeah, Jaybar, apparently your body sometimes just tells you it needs a rest day? That actually happened to me this Tuesday - shoes laced up and ready to go, and I just got this deep sense of "You know what? We shouldn't exercise today. Today, we need Indian food and a movie." Sounds like laziness, but I swear it wasn't - more like a no-nonsense inner mom who knows what's best for you and is deaf to your whining about "but my training plaan" and "but we're already at the gyyym". Wednesday's run felt great.

               

              A.R.I.T.A. Active Recovery Is The Answer. The question comes up is ...... how much? If you go for a run when fatigued, well this is active recovery. Is 4 miles easy good or 8 miles or 2 miles or 2 miles of walking?? If you do too much.....even if running easy you risk further breakdown. It is kind of a science to listen to your body. It takes time to figure this out so you don't breakdown and risk injury.  I use H-Wave device for active recovery which I am partial to as I work for the company. It provides muscle activation and active recovery without fatique and actually enhances recovery and flushing and rehabs tissue. This is even more beneficial when injured and can't run. Walking is good too for recovery and cross training as mentioned. You just need to figure out the right amount. I do know that sitting around and doing absolutely nothing does not enhance recovery. AND icing will flat out delay recovery. Don't do it.

              H-WAVE - Helping Athletes Reduce Pain and Recover Faster

              strambo


                As others said, you definitely need "recovery" days and/or easy ones to go with the harder ones.

                 

                Regarding cross-training, even if you could run every day as your only form of exercises, you shouldn't.  In order to be truly fit and help prevent injuries, you need to add in core and upper/lower body strength training as well.  No gym membership needed, it can be with body weight at home.  Real strength training though, not just high rep, hardly any resistance stuff.

                 

                The true 360 deg. core and lower body strength will help prevent running injuries and the upper body strength is just to round things out and prevent upper body shoulder and back injuries.  You won't pack on much muscle if that is a concern.

                jeffdonahue


                  I have run every day for over 11 years now - my rest days are my 1 mile days that I run at a nice easy almost leisurely pace.  The trick is to not try to jam them out just because they are only a mile, and to know when to take them.

                   

                  There are some periods where I run a lot and realize that I need a bit more rest so I might actually take 2-3 of these 1 mile days in a row.

                   

                  I really do feel that the light easy miles really do help recovery, especially the days after a race.

                     

                     

                    I really do feel that the light easy miles really do help recovery, especially the days after a race.

                     

                    Do you think the same results could be achieved by, for example, a 1-mile walk?

                    Tchuck


                      Jaybar, absolutely walking will help because it is "active recovery". If not running then walking is closest movement. You may be able to walk 2-3 miles. The key is to not do too much where you risk further breakdown and enhance the recovery process. After a hard work out or many miles of running you do have muscle damage, your body responds with inflammatory phase which you want to get through ASAP. Movement activates lymphatic system, flushes wastes and fluids and brings in nutrient rich blood flow. You then go to repair phase and remodeling phase which are both helped with muscle activation like jogging or walking. The challenge is finding what is right amount and not doing too much. Jeff has figured out for himself. We all have to figure it out for ourselves.

                      H-WAVE - Helping Athletes Reduce Pain and Recover Faster


                      Gang Name "Pound Cake"

                        "I've gotten injured before from doing too much too soon."

                         

                        You answered your own question with the above statement.

                        - Scott

                        2014 Goals: First Marathon - BQ2016 <3:40 (3:25:18) - 1/2M <1:45 - 5K <22:00

                        2014 Marathons: 05/04 Flying Pig (3:49:02) - 09/20 Air Force (BQ 3:25:18) - 11/01 Indianapolis Monumental

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