Running-Wizard

1

Hill workout video (Read 66 times)

JML


    One of the questions that I had when I ran my first Running Wizard cycle was how to do the hill workouts.  I initially thought that it was a speed / sprint run where it is actually more of a bounding motion.  I found the video below on the Lydiard foundation website [narrated by Arthur Lydiard himself] that illustrates the correct form and talks more about the purpose of the workout.  I think that it is also referenced in the detailed write-up for hill workouts on the Running Wizard site, but I thought that it might be useful to publish it here as well for people new to this type of workout.

     

    http://www.lydiardfoundation.org/training/hilltrainingdvd.aspx

     2014 goals: run a bunch....race some.....repeat...


    Hill Slug

      Thanks for the link that was really informative.   I'm not at the hill phase yet so this was really useful.   I've done similar things in the distant past, but really never got an explanation why we were doing them.

      All time PR:  1:20 HM. 2:49 M

      2013 goal:  Master's PR HM  Recover from illness/finish the year strong

       

      Rage, rage against the dying of the light

        Thanks JML, I have also never done hill workouts before so this is definitely helpful! Big grin

        Being a slow runner means I get to check out YOUR butt...

         

        This is how I do it... http://nikeplus.nike.com/plus/profile/SarahinShibs/

          thanks for linking this, totally changed my current thought process on what my next week of hills was going to look like!! i have these preconcieved ideas for how something should look, and i am so glad that i watched that clip to get a good visual on what i am actually supposed to be doing instead!!


          MM #6177

            Oh, that link is great, thanks! Now is that the springing or the bounding? I'm supposed to be doing springing now, just started my hill segment this week. Seems to me that's bounding, just by the description and my understanding of the word itself. So confusing!


            Hill Slug

              I would say that was bounding too, but that's just my guess.  I'm attempting to do springing/bouncing motion on my hills.

              All time PR:  1:20 HM. 2:49 M

              2013 goal:  Master's PR HM  Recover from illness/finish the year strong

               

              Rage, rage against the dying of the light

                Sorry for being so confusing!! ;o)

                 

                We are planning on starting to film some of the workouts--hill training, 50/50, even intervals...  At any rate, as for hill training (and, I know I got in here a bit late and hope it's not "too" late...!!), at that site, there are 3 exercises posted; (1) Steep Hill Running, (2) Bounding and (3) Springing.  Actually, names don't really matter.  But I would DEFINITELY recommend you do Steep Hill Running--basically, a high knee exercise with slow forward momentum.  You CAN try bounding and/or springing but they are pretty darn stressful!!  Actually, you'd be lucky if you could do it right to begin with!! (I was a triple jumper when I was in middle school and that's why Arthur loved me demonstrating it).  If you don't have an adequate hill (and this is something we definitely need to film and post), use treadmill or steps.  I was on a spring vacation last week and, at where we were staying, we had some pretty good steps--it was only about 100 steps but quite steep.  I hadn't done much of this and, when I tried to go up, with SLOW forward momentum and one step at a time, it WAS a pretty darn good exercise!!  Trust me; DO NOT BE TOO AMBITIOUS at first.  Particularly, you're not quite ready to do too much demanding exercises yet.  Capitalize what you had developed most up until now--stamina and strength (from long runs).  Go easy, but try to work on the volume.  Max is about an hour; work your way up to about an hour of hill exercise (excluding warm-up and cool-down).

                 

                A few years back, I was training with this young girl whom I was coaching to be an 800m runner.  We have MN Science Museum in St. Paul with 120 steps on the side of the building.  This works great because it doesn't go around and around.  It's pretty much straight and then only 2 turns to the top.  We would run up (we alternated one-step and two-steps), jog across the top to the near-by downhill--this downhill works quite well because it's a very gradual downhill and we can let go of the free wheel and run down fast.  Jog a little and may or may not do some striding at the bottom.  This was ONE CYCLE.  During this workout, we are working on several different developments--power and flexibility from up hill; leg-speed and eccentric exercise on the downhill section; easy stride to start introducing some level of anaerobic energy system.  And, if you could work your way up to an hour, the volume is there as well.  If you start out too fast and poop out quickly, then the volume would go out the window.  You don't want to do that---as yet.

                 

                Quite often, not just hill training but intervals or tempo run as well, many people think if you run them faster, it's better.  It's not so.  You may sacrifice the volume by doing it that way and, particularly in the first half of the program, it's not desirable.  Again, same thing--if you try to do bounding or springing when you're not quite ready, then the volume would go out the window and that's not good.

                 

                Think of ourself climbing up a pyramid.  You start with lots of volume--and because of that, you need to go easy so you won't finish up the workout too short.  As you climb up, the volume would go down but sharpen up...get faster.  Some program may suggest otherwise; you go up and up the volume...before a marathon (particularly for a marathon).  It may sound logical but not really.  Surely, some had done well seemingly that way (Steve Spence).  But remember one thing: YOU CANNOT TRAIN HARD AND RACE WELL AT THE SAME TIME.  In other words, when you race, you'll need to be FRESH and SHARP.  If you're doing heavy work load, you will not be able to be fresh and sharp.  That's what taper is for.  But most people don't quite understand taper.  Taper is not just easing up whenever.  You'll need to sharpen up as well.

                 

                It may be confusing at first; but when you think logically, then it'll start to come naturally to you.

                Oh, that link is great, thanks! Now is that the springing or the bounding? I'm supposed to be doing springing now, just started my hill segment this week. Seems to me that's bounding, just by the description and my understanding of the word itself. So confusing!


                MM #6177

                   

                  It may be confusing at first; but when you think logically, then it'll start to come naturally to you.

                   

                  Yes, several weeks further on now, it really IS making sense. Thanks.

                     Yes, several weeks further on now, it really IS making sense. Thanks.

                    I'm glad to hear.  Today, I was driving down this local hill and I saw this guy shuffling along up the hill.  His running style was a typical short-stride shuffling style with his knees hardly coming up, landing on his heel (it is actually hard to land on your heel going up the hill...).

                     

                    Do not make such a mistake; the idea of Lydiard hill training is to exaggerate running action (as shown in Steep Hill Running) particularly the knee lift and back leg push-off.  Short-stride is fine--in fact, unless you're doing the Bounding, the strides will be short--but you should feel the effect in your quads and calves.  For this reason, actually, that I personally think step running might be an even better alternative because it forces you to do the right action.

                     

                    When doing the hill exercise, think of at least 3 things: (1) good knee lift, (2) good push-off with the back leg and (3) keeping a good posture.

                    JML


                      Interesting item related to hill workouts.  Seems like they are beneficial....who knew? Smile

                       

                      http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/study-all-hill-repeats-improve-5-k-performance

                       2014 goals: run a bunch....race some.....repeat...

                        Interesting item related to hill workouts.  Seems like they are beneficial....who knew? Smile

                         

                        http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/study-all-hill-repeats-improve-5-k-performance

                        Oh, Scott... ;o)  I've found this quite fascinating that some people seem to just LOVE to try to reinvent--or, in this case, rather "re-introcue"--something that has been introduced, and proven effective, for more than a half century.  Hills are good.  Period.

                         

                        Of course, there's always a bit of a twist.  Depending on what you're trying to achieve, HOW YOU DO IT may differ slightly.  Percy Cerutty was very well-known for his sand-dune hill sprints.  That's a hill workout.  Now, our (Lydiard's) hill training is a bit different.  And, again, if you don't understand what you're trying to achieve with it and where it's placed in terms of the big picture, you may totally screw up the entire plan.

                         

                        I love these "one tip" video or short article; they talk about "it's found that this MAY help..." and that's pretty much all it says.  Very few actually explain how you can incorporate it in your program.  So some people just jump and include that.  I saw, at the general message board, someone asking about hill training.  Just slapping some hill workout to your current training plan, again, to me, is crap-shooting.  Surely, hills would help but, if you do it that way, it may actually hurt you and many had ended up getting injured.

                         

                        I also found it interesting how Scott J explaining to "shorten your strides going uphill..."  I'd be curious to see if anyone would, or could, actually lengthen their strides going up the hill!! ;o)  Unless of course you're doing BOUNDING uphill!

                        JML


                          I love these "one tip" video or short article; they talk about "it's found that this MAY help..." and that's pretty much all it says.  Very few actually explain how you can incorporate it in your program.  So some people just jump and include that.  I saw, at the general message board, someone asking about hill training.  Just slapping some hill workout to your current training plan, again, to me, is crap-shooting.  Surely, hills would help but, if you do it that way, it may actually hurt you and many had ended up getting injured.

                           

                           

                          I 100% agree with you on this Nobby.  One of the guys in my running group asked me which run I consider to be the 'Key workout' in my plan.  My answer was "all of them".  I think that this type of news article taps into the desire that people have to find a shortcut or the secret to improving faster.  In my experience, the only path to success is consistent training following an intelligent plan.

                           2014 goals: run a bunch....race some.....repeat...