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Orthotics yes or no? (Read 50 times)

ud32


    I've been dealing Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis since May '20. I run in Brooks Ghots and Saucony ISO shoes. Pain is on each side of my right heel. Went to podiatrist Sept. 1st. X-ray showed a possible healed stress fracture. Took Prednisone for a week, wore "night splint" style boot as much as possible, and over the counter orthotics from Dr. office. Stopped running completely. After a month somewhat better but tried to run and it hurt, not as bad, doctor suggested laser therapy to promote blood flow to area an help healing process. Did 6-8 treatments. Got to about 50% better. Tried to reintroduce running, still hurts, not as bad.

     

    I also have a problem in my left foot that flares up 2-3x year, out of nowhere outside ankle feels like it locks up and get a sever pain mid-run, excruciating in AM upon waking or after sitting. Mysteriously goes away 7-10 days. Dr. says that joint area not aligned and prone to "pinching". Says I need custom orthotics. I'm so frustrated not being able to run I said OK and am now having second thoughts.

     

    Dr. says it takes 4-6 weeks for my body to adjust to them. I read stuff online, pros & cons but appears once you commit tot hem you have to stick with them.

     

    I do resistance training but tend to overlooks legs. Would I be better off 1) Switching to a stability shoe 2) Strength training my legs and supporting lower body muscles and 3) Just wearing the orthotics when not running.

     

    Any opinion or anyone with experience with orthotics or bypassing them? Thanks.

      My opinions based on personal experience and reading many other people's anecdotes:

       

      No; with an exception.

       

      Using orthotics or "special" shoes like a bandaid until the damage heals is the exception. And, you don't need high-dollar "custom" insoles no matter how much the person selling them says you do. The human foot is the result of millions of years of evolution, and that did not arrive at a design that is not functional unless it has artificial restrictions on it's movement.

       

      Once you're running with acceptable discomfort and not getting worse, wean yourself off the orthotics/insoles.

       

      Shoe wear patterns will show you whether a stability or motion control shoe might help with overuse injuries, but the vast majority of runners are better off with neutral shoes. If you have extreme pronation and ankle movement, then yeah, try some stability shoes!

       

      My experiences, which are mine alone and not applicable to everyone and anyone:

      PF; I used the most cushioned shoes I could get at the time (Hoka Stinson ATR) with rigid high arch insoles (Sole Karnazes model) and that allowed me to continue to put in some miles while the PF healed. After a month or more, the rigid insoles hurt more than the PF so I used them less and less. The arch is SUPPOSED to flex, it's like a leaf spring in your foot. Wearing Strutz padded arch bands (not running) helped reduce pain a lot. They were too thick to wear running; the thickness hurt more than the PF.

      Achilles; off and on for almost 10 years now. I have yet to discover a shoe or insole that reduces pain much while running when it flares up. Changing gait to shorter strides and slower pace helps, as do days off. It takes time to heal up and the best you can do is find a way to get in miles while not making it worse. I found that eccentric heal drops DO help, but I forget to do them when I'm NOT hurt! Some people have been able to totally recover from achilles issues via boatloads of eccentric heal drops, 250-400 a day, often with extra weight. I'm on that schedule now, and sticking to it even when NOT hurt, to see if it will work for me.

      55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

      CanadianMeg


      Kicking Asphalt for 2021

        Question: are you seeing a general podiatrist or a sports doc? \

         

        Also wondering what you are wearing on your foot the rest of the time. Keep in mind that if you are wearing crappy shoes when not running, it's not going to help you heal up either.

        Half Fanatic #9292. 


        Train SMART

          I don't think everyone needs orthotics but it can benefit some. Back in the early 90s when in fitness industry I was very active teaching classes and running. My bunion pain was throbbing and shin splints were chronic for 3 years. I went to podiatrist and said, "I want and need orthotics". He said your foot looks and acts normal and was reluctant to just give them to me. He wrapped up my foot to simulate what an orthotic would do for me and told me to go teach my class that involved running, stairs, jump roping, sprints etc. It truely was a life changing moment for me because both my bunion and shin pain was minimized significantly in that class. I got fitted. Within 6 weeks my shin pain was virtually gone,  bunion union pain controlled as well.  I have now worn orthotics nearly 30 years and have still have my bunion (no pain) and shins have not bothered me since.

           

          I work with podiatrists and one recommended this company. I have used them over the last 7 years and love them. I now have 3 sets from them and rotate and they have refurbished once. Mine are made from cork (so light-ask them about that) for running and my adjustment time was zero.

          https://www.footdynamics.com/custom-orthotics-for-runners/

          https://www.footdynamics.com/product/running-orthotics/

          https://www.footdynamics.com/shop-online/free-foot-evaluation/

           

          I would also assume you are doing hip/glute and foot strength and mobility work. This is part of proper foot/ankle function and strength.

          THE RECOVERY MAN. Run Injury Free. www.smartapproachtraining.com

          ud32


            Question: are you seeing a general podiatrist or a sports doc? \

             

            Also wondering what you are wearing on your foot the rest of the time. Keep in mind that if you are wearing crappy shoes when not running, it's not going to help you heal up either.

             

            I believe doc is general podiatrist, accreditations are " DPM, FACFAS" . When not running I tend to wear my older running shoes or casual Nike sneakers. I've been wearing the custom orthotics in those shoes per doctors instructions. I have casual dress shoes for work and use the over the counter (blue) Redithotics purchased at the doctor's office back in October. On a side note my knees feel sore/achy - perhaps due to wearing custom orthotics and going thru "adjustment period"??

            ud32


               

               I would also assume you are doing hip/glute and foot strength and mobility work. This is part of proper foot/ankle function and strength.

               

              Unfortunately I really was not doing any lower body strength and mobility work. I literally just started to do some exercises so I am optimistic these will have an impact. I'll check the foot dynamics site too.Thanks

              BoutWorkout


                 

                Unfortunately I really was not doing any lower body strength and mobility work. I literally just started to do some exercises so I am optimistic these will have an impact. I'll check the foot dynamics site too.Thanks

                 

                You should, just to ease up your injury.