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Ran in snow tonight, shins hurt (Read 199 times)


Old , Ugly and slow

    I have a pair of muck boots that are army surplus.

     

    I would not even try to run in them.

    pr's 5k 20.08, 5 mile 31:20, 10k  41.19  all done in the 80's

     

    2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

    pedaling fool


      About 2" freshies on the off-road trail. 26F and stormy, so I wore a coat and Muck boots. They are light and cover the ankle. They fit good, no slipping in them.

       

      My calves hurt while running. I think the soles are too flat, so the front of my foot was doing more work to break over, each stride. That hurt my calves. Not so much ouch, but more just could feel them working harder, getting sore.

       

      Then my shins started to feel tired. After 2 miles I slowed to a walk for a mile. Then came in.

       

      My guess is I'm just using muscles not used to it, with the snow, and the boots. I'll try sneakers next time, but as the snow gets deeper, I will be wearing boots. Maybe gore-tex hiking boots that cover the ankle, or maybe these neoprene Muck boots.

       

      I'm always on the edge of having shin splints develop. Had them decades ago in track. Currently just run trails, 3 to 5 miles a couple times a week, plus one soccer game a week. The soccer never seems to bother the shins. Last time I ran at the locsl HS track, they hurt, so I'm not doing that much. My only roads will be the occassional 5k race, which I haven't done yet. My hope is my shin muscles will strengthen for the snowy trail running. Soon it will be 6" or more, thus the boots. If no snow, and just cold, I'd wear sneakers. Tonight was crappy out, and a test for what is to come.

      This reminds me of the first time I ran barefoot in soft sand. I had been running for over two years and thought I’d never get shin splints again; I had run mostly on pavement and occasionally barefoot on hardpacked sand (near the surf), but always wanted to try and run in the softer sand away from the surf, but put that off for over a year, mostly because I knew it would slow me way down and like any runner I was always trying to break a "new record". And just the thought of it was somewhat tormenting; it's very difficult to do when you're not use to it.

       

      Then one day I decided to give it a try, only ran about 3 miles and after that I had the worst shin splints I've felt in a very long time. I think it's from both using muscles/connective tissue that don't get stressed much during normal flat running, but also some flexibiblity factor, because the foot is being put in positions (during dynamic movement) that it's just not use to; but now it's not a problem, just took a while to get use to.

       

      So as far as I'm concerned, running barefoot on the beach is also great for building up those underused muscles/tendons and adding flexiblity.

       It's just pain, which is only  weakness leaving the body.

       

       

      I would think soft snow would be fairly comparable to soft sand.

       

       

       

       

      .

        Normal running shoes

        • add yaktrax or other traction device when required - ice & heavy packed snow,
        • Stop snow/slush in the shoes (I've just put up with it 'till this year, but it seems to work well) with duct tape over the mesh part of the shoe,
        • I use MEC short gaiters. They work, they're cheap. There's a MEC in town.

        Some days I pick one, some days all three. Once I put the duct tape on, is there until it falls off or spring, I think.

        2013 Goal: Make 3:00:16 go away - FAIL.

        2014 Goal: Make 3:00:16 go away.

          I have a pair of muck boots that are army surplus.

           

          I would not even try to run in them.

           

          I still have my boots from the Marines "given" to me back in 1977; I was "forced" to run in them a time or three.  That said, true Muck boots (the brand not the function) are decidedly not for running.

            This reminds me of the first time I ran barefoot in soft sand. I had been running for over two years and thought I’d never get shin splints again; I had run mostly on pavement and occasionally barefoot on hardpacked sand (near the surf), but always wanted to try and run in the softer sand away from the surf, but put that off for over a year, mostly because I knew it would slow me way down and like any runner I was always trying to break a "new record". And just the thought of it was somewhat tormenting; it's very difficult to do when you're not use to it.

             

            Then one day I decided to give it a try, only ran about 3 miles and after that I had the worst shin splints I've felt in a very long time. I think it's from both using muscles/connective tissue that don't get stressed much during normal flat running, but also some flexibiblity factor, because the foot is being put in positions (during dynamic movement) that it's just not use to; but now it's not a problem, just took a while to get use to.

             

            So as far as I'm concerned, running barefoot on the beach is also great for building up those underused muscles/tendons and adding flexiblity.

             It's just pain, which is only  weakness leaving the body.

             

             

            I would think soft snow would be fairly comparable to soft sand.

             

             

             

             

            .

            Thanks, I think that is a great analogy!  And probably exactly what happened to me, just substitute snow for sand.  Wanna trade?

             

            I've been running more on snow, in my my new gore-tex running shoes, and my shins haven't been bothering me.  But I'm probably just getting more used to the snow Smile

               

              I still have my boots from the Marines "given" to me back in 1977; I was "forced" to run in them a time or three.  That said, true Muck boots (the brand not the function) are decidedly not for running.

               

              Ah, that explains the Corsair.

               

              To play devil's advocate, what is the difference between minimalist running shoes and Muck brand boots, as far running goes?  Take away the support, foot down low, near 0 drop.  Sounds like a minimalist running shoe, doesn't it?

               

              Granted, I actually like running shoes that have some wedge shape and help me to roll over the toe (break over the toe).  Not so much wedge to force a heel strike, but enough to help me run.  So just your basic running shoe, plus extra money for all the glitzy colors and materials they come in nowadays Smile

                Muck brand boots vs. mimimalist shoes: WEIGHT and Flexibility are two major differences I can think of off hand.  Smile


                day after day sameness

                  RA has a number of runners from MN, Wisconsin, Canada, New England, and other winter places...so there has been lots of good discussions on running in the snow in the forums. 

                   

                  This is one, and has advice from a professional running coach (who happens to live in MN) at the bottom of page 1.

                   

                  Here's another which focus on slush/wet feet.

                  I've done my best to live the right way; I get up every morning and go to work each day...

                    Last night I wore a heavier and taller pair of Muck boots, called Artic Sport. They have a firmer tread, and a heel, that gives much better traction in the snow. They didn't hurt my shins. My quads were tired though.

                     

                    Reason I wore them is it was about 16" of snow, and a single snowmobile made a track, but not packed. Pushing it down to about 6" of uneven snow, sometimes more, sometimes less, as the running surface in the middle. After it gets packed down more, I'll switch back to my running shoes.

                     

                    Instead of calling it running in my journal, I call it slogging. And the important thing isn't the distance, but the time spent doing it Smile

                     

                    The main thing is my shins didn't hurt!
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